The Calligrapher’s Bible: 100 Complete Alphabets and How to Draw Them by David Harris

I mark this as “read,” which I have, but the fact of the matter is I’ll be working through this one for many years to come. I got a random idea in my head that I should try to make a medieval style manuscript and all that implies. You know, just because I can. The reality is it’s one monster of an end goal, and this book is the first step into this bizarre little quest of mine. But it’s a worthy book, easily and instantly applied with direct instructions and illustrations.

5 stars

the-calligraphers-bible

4 thoughts on “The Calligrapher’s Bible: 100 Complete Alphabets and How to Draw Them by David Harris

  1. Word of advice (been here, done that): If you ever do calligraphy, get the calligraphy felt tipped pens rather than the reservoir, fountain-pen type calligraphy pens with detachable nibs. The fountain pen types are a nightmare – takes forever to get the ink to flow and then it flows too much and you end up scraping holes in the paper/parchment. The ink also tends to dry up in the nib and then you spend the next hour trying to wash it out (hopefully you have used water soluble ink and not India Ink, otherwise you can throw the nib away). Even the old fashioned dip pens with calligraphy tips work better than the fountain-pen type pens. And use water soluble ink if you use dip pens. Also, put a piece of paper or tissue under your hand when writing, otherwise you end up with smudges. 🙂

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    • I have both. The felt tips are definitely the way to go for beginners. I did find a great nib pen at Scarborough last year though, so I practice frequently with it without the hassles you mention that are painfully common. I’m working my way up to carving my own feather pens. I want to someday get the full Medieval appreciation behind illuminated manuscript.

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