Cognitive Behavioral Therapy: Techniques for Retraining Your Brain by Prof. Jason M. Satterfield (The Great Courses)

The problem with most self help books is that you get some good ideas to build upon, but there’s a spiral effect that actually makes a given problem worse on some level, which then causes the person to think that maybe the information was incomplete, so they seek out another book, and cycle repeats until you’ve exhausted everything on a given topic.  I speak firsthand on this one.  Sooner or later you just get to the point where you declare, “Stand back!  I’m going to try science!”

I picked up this title from The Great Courses knowing that the information here is offered, not as a means to make money, but as a means to educate.  In short, I picked this up looking for the means to save my life.

This builds on a great many areas of research I’ve dug into over the years.  Mentally, CBT offers a person real means to combat depression, anger, and anxiety, all of which fuel themselves on a lifetime of autonomic responses to negative stimuli.  That by itself would be enough to make this lecture series worth it.  What I did not know is that CBT can be used to help combat chronic physical conditions as well.  Considering the mind-body connection, that’s not really a surprise, but it’s interesting to hear how it works by itself and in conjunction with other therapies.  In all cases, I was impressed that this series includes actual recorded therapy sessions with clients that you get to know and can chart their progress.  It’s practical information with practical results.

I’ve been using the techniques presented here for a few days now, and I’m already feeling better.  Overcoming the lifetime of programming will be slower, but it can be done.  This series has already proven it to me on some level.  The rest is up to me.

5 stars

cognitive-behavioral-therapy