“The Problem of Thor Bridge” by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

This tale was published in 1922.  The time of the story itself is unknown, only that it takes place in October, and Holmes and Watson have a new cook. Former senator from "some Western state" and entrepreneurial "Gold King" Neil Gibson comes to Holmes to investigate the murder of his wife Maria... and to clear … Continue reading “The Problem of Thor Bridge” by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

“The Adventure of the Three Garridebs” by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

Published in October 1924, this story takes place at "the latter end of June, 1902... the same month that Holmes refused a knighthood for services which may perhaps some day be described."  It is of note that Sir Arthur Conan Doyle clearly didn't refuse his own knighthood, which happened around this time frame.  Speaks quite … Continue reading “The Adventure of the Three Garridebs” by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

“The Adventure of the Sussex Vampire” by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

Given the timing of how this story just happened to line up with our calendar, BrokenTune and I didn't think anyone would have a problem with bumping our regular Friday schedule up just a couple of days so that our vampire story would land properly on Halloween.  Seems only right. There are two points that … Continue reading “The Adventure of the Sussex Vampire” by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

“The Adventure of the Three Gables” by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

Before I begin this, perhaps a note is in order regarding this particular story.  In the past, we've already seen that Sir Arthur Conan Doyle had no problem portraying people of color in his stories, and he was largely sympathetic to the idea of treating everyone equally.  Class, race... it didn't  matter to him.  Having … Continue reading “The Adventure of the Three Gables” by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

“The Adventure of the Mazarin Stone” by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

This one was published in October 1921, and while the date of the story is unknown, we, and the page boy Billy, are assured by Watson that the ploy being discussed has been used once before, which we've seen in "The Adventure of the Empty House," marking Holmes' return from the Great Hiatus.  Remember that … Continue reading “The Adventure of the Mazarin Stone” by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

“The Adventure of the Blanched Soldier” by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

"I see no more than you, but I have trained myself to notice what I see." Published in October 1926 and taking place in January 1903, during the time when Watson had married, his only "selfish action" in Holmes' estimation of their time together.  And that brings up a major point: this story is one … Continue reading “The Adventure of the Blanched Soldier” by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

“The Adventure of the Illustrious Client” by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

As stated elsewhere, due to copyright locks, this is where I part ways with the Stephen Fry narration as they are unavailable here in the States.  But I have my trusty version narrated by Simon Vance, so I'm still in great hands. With this story, we officially begin the final collection of the Great Detective's … Continue reading “The Adventure of the Illustrious Client” by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

“The Adventure of the Devil’s Foot” by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

Following the death of his first wife in 1906, belief in the Otherworld ramped up for Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.  Spiritualism was a big deal at that point in history, with Theosophy holding sway in the UK and the US from the mid-1870s to the late 1920s.  But Conan Doyle's interest in the supernatural was … Continue reading “The Adventure of the Devil’s Foot” by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

“The Disappearance of Lady Frances Carfax” by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

"You know that I cannot possibly leave London while old Abrahams is in such mortal terror of his life.  Besides, on general principles it is best that I should not leave the country.  Scotland Yard feels lonely without me, and it causes an unhealthy excitement among the criminal classes." This is one of those stories … Continue reading “The Disappearance of Lady Frances Carfax” by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle