The Story of Civilization, Vol. V: The Renaissance by Will Durant

"Don't be so gloomy. After all, it's not that awful. Like the fella says, in Italy for 30 years under the Borgias, they had warfare, terror, murder, and bloodshed, but they produced Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci, and the Renaissance. In Switzerland, they had brotherly love -- they had 500 years of democracy and peace, and … Continue reading The Story of Civilization, Vol. V: The Renaissance by Will Durant

Fire and Fury: Inside the Trump White House by Michael Wolff

Back in college, I had the privilege to take some journalism courses and operate on a newspaper overseen by an old school newshound.  A lot has changed in the world of journalism since then, and certainly since the time of my instructor.  What I learned informs my perception of the media today: where it continues … Continue reading Fire and Fury: Inside the Trump White House by Michael Wolff

Take a Walk on the Dark Side: Rock and Roll Myths, Legends, and Curses by R. Gary Patterson

I think Robert Johnson is haunting me.  At the very least, he's keen to look in on me from time to time.  Perhaps it's his way of saying "thank you" for playing his music.  It wasn't that long ago that I listened to an audiobook on his life, death, and afterlife.  From there, I started … Continue reading Take a Walk on the Dark Side: Rock and Roll Myths, Legends, and Curses by R. Gary Patterson

What Unites Us: Reflections on Patriotism by Dan Rather and Elliot Kirschner

It would be difficult to argue against the idea that when it comes to the modern world, Dan Rather has had an up close and personal look at whichever topic you want to discuss, from virtually every angle you can discuss it.  Politics, war, peace, natural disaster, social and environmental engineering... he's seen it all, … Continue reading What Unites Us: Reflections on Patriotism by Dan Rather and Elliot Kirschner

Bosworth 1485: Psychology of a Battle by Michael Jones

My recent dives into William Shakespeare's historical plays revolving around the Wars of the Roses has nudged me to dig a little deeper into the grand finale of that civil war: the Battle of Bosworth.  On August 22, 1485, the war between Lancaster and York ended with the death of Richard III, and the crowning … Continue reading Bosworth 1485: Psychology of a Battle by Michael Jones

The Grouchy Historian by Ed Asner and Ed. Weinberger

Because seemingly every nonfiction book these days needs a title that just rolls off the tongue, the full title of this book is The Grouchy Historian: An Old-Time Lefty Defends Our Constitution Against Right-Wing Hypocrites and Nutjobs.  So as you can probably tell, there's some bias in play here.  And that's perfectly fine; sometimes understanding where the bias … Continue reading The Grouchy Historian by Ed Asner and Ed. Weinberger

The Templars: The Rise and Spectacular Fall of God’s Holy Warriors by Dan Jones

This review will probably come as a surprise to absolutely no one.  As a medievalist and someone with a particular interest in knights and chivalry, the Knights Templar feature prominently in my studies.  I have also been impressed by Dan Jones' previous works The Plantagenets and The Wars of the Roses, the latter of which managed … Continue reading The Templars: The Rise and Spectacular Fall of God’s Holy Warriors by Dan Jones